Sustainability, reducing energy use, cutting carbon emissions and slowing the effects of climate change are all top of the agenda for people around the world, and that's certainly true for us here at Marley.

At the start of the pandemic, there was a lot of anxiety as we all stayed at home and tried to understand what was happening. But there was one silver lining: we discovered an opportunity for change – shifts in behaviour that would positively impact our families, businesses, communities and the world.

Whether it was driving less, working from home, spending more time with our families, or bringing back an appreciation for our outdoor spaces, lockdown showed us that there are other ways to live our lives – and that change can be quick, if we are suitably motivated.

“Home” became so much more

Because of COVID-19, we learned how to do a lot of things at home. We worked, educated, exercised and shopped from home. For many of us, our flats and houses became where we spent all of our time, with only necessary trips out for supplies being allowed. While we’re all looking forward to “getting back to normal” in many ways, we have also realised that “normal” had its problems – for our personal lives, our communities and the environment.

Being at home led to an improved work/life balance, saving money and cutting our transportation, and therefore reducing the toll that the daily commute has on our lives, our bank accounts and the environment.

Home improvement was a big theme of the pandemic, and we have carried out extensive research to learn about the impact that 2020 had on the way people live their lives and use their homes. You can read more about it in our whitepaper: Raising the roof: Homes and communities in a post-covid UK.

During lockdown, people took the opportunity to decorate, do repairs, make efficiency upgrades and start gardening. But as restrictions ease, those trends are expected to continue, with a quarter of homeowners saying they want to improve their properties further.

We also learned to value our local communities, and discussions have emerged about ‘polo mint’ economies, reviving local high streets and the promotion of ‘15-minute cities’. Since the pandemic began, 73% of homeowners, 64% of private tenants and 66% of social housing tenants have spent more or the same amount of time in their local communities.

Many people have also made the decision to move home. Between a fifth and a quarter of all tenants say they are now looking to move because of their experiences in the past year – a possible sign of the volatility and general dissatisfaction people have with the rental market.

There is also an increased desire to move from urban areas into the suburbs or rural locations, with people inspired by their newfound ability to work from home and improve their lives beyond the nine to five. You can find out more about how the pandemic has impacted the way we live by downloading our whitepaper: Raising the roof: Homes and communities in a post-covid UK.

So, how do architects, specifiers, housebuilders, landlords, and social housing providers respond to these emerging, potentially long-term trends? Particularly in regard to the ongoing challenges of providing high-quality, affordable housing that also achieves national sustainability targets?

Click VISIT SUPPLIER WEBSITE below to find out more.


Sustainability, reducing energy use, cutting carbon emissions and slowing the effects of climate change are all top of the agenda for people around the world, and that's certainly true for us here at Marley.

At the start of the pandemic, there was a lot of anxiety as we all stayed at home and tried to understand what was happening. But there was one silver lining: we discovered an opportunity for change – shifts in behaviour that would positively impact our families, businesses, communities and the world.

Whether it was driving less, working from home, spending more time with our families, or bringing back an appreciation for our outdoor spaces, lockdown showed us that there are other ways to live our lives – and that change can be quick, if we are suitably motivated.

“Home” became so much more

Because of COVID-19, we learned how to do a lot of things at home. We worked, educated, exercised and shopped from home. For many of us, our flats and houses became where we spent all of our time, with only necessary trips out for supplies being allowed. While we’re all looking forward to “getting back to normal” in many ways, we have also realised that “normal” had its problems – for our personal lives, our communities and the environment.

Being at home led to an improved work/life balance, saving money and cutting our transportation, and therefore reducing the toll that the daily commute has on our lives, our bank accounts and the environment.

Home improvement was a big theme of the pandemic, and we have carried out extensive research to learn about the impact that 2020 had on the way people live their lives and use their homes. You can read more about it in our whitepaper: Raising the roof: Homes and communities in a post-covid UK.

During lockdown, people took the opportunity to decorate, do repairs, make efficiency upgrades and start gardening. But as restrictions ease, those trends are expected to continue, with a quarter of homeowners saying they want to improve their properties further.

We also learned to value our local communities, and discussions have emerged about ‘polo mint’ economies, reviving local high streets and the promotion of ‘15-minute cities’. Since the pandemic began, 73% of homeowners, 64% of private tenants and 66% of social housing tenants have spent more or the same amount of time in their local communities.

Many people have also made the decision to move home. Between a fifth and a quarter of all tenants say they are now looking to move because of their experiences in the past year – a possible sign of the volatility and general dissatisfaction people have with the rental market.

There is also an increased desire to move from urban areas into the suburbs or rural locations, with people inspired by their newfound ability to work from home and improve their lives beyond the nine to five. You can find out more about how the pandemic has impacted the way we live by downloading our whitepaper: Raising the roof: Homes and communities in a post-covid UK.

So, how do architects, specifiers, housebuilders, landlords, and social housing providers respond to these emerging, potentially long-term trends? Particularly in regard to the ongoing challenges of providing high-quality, affordable housing that also achieves national sustainability targets?

Click VISIT SUPPLIER WEBSITE below to find out more.


 
 
 
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