Sector Culture and heritage
Project type New build
Year completed 2015
Project location Scotland
Contractor Maxi Construction
Products used SterlingOSB
 
 

Norbord’s SterlingOSB have been chosen for the construction of wall panels at the new visitor centre for the Kelpies, artist Andy Scott’s enormous steel horse-head sculptures near Falkirk, Scotland.

SterlingOSB was specified by the project engineer and Alan Barton, project manager with main contractor Maxi Construction, who says that it is widely used on most of the projects he works on. “It’s in nearly all timber frame systems and is widely used for roof sarking, especially here in Scotland.” 

Alan estimates that this project will require approximately 1,000 sq m of SterlingOSB for the 100m-long building.

Timber frame construction usually involves the manufacture of panels by specialists off-site. But that is not the case on this project, says Alan: “We are making the panels up ourselves, rather than have them manufactured by a timber-frame company,” he says. Unlike modern timber frame, this design uses steel for the main structural elements and is therefore not ‘timber frame construction’ in the true sense.

The panels, which are made to close tolerances, comprise basic softwood frames incorporating thermal insulation and vapour membranes with SterlingOSB ‘skins’ on both sides to provide strength and stiffness.


Norbord’s SterlingOSB have been chosen for the construction of wall panels at the new visitor centre for the Kelpies, artist Andy Scott’s enormous steel horse-head sculptures near Falkirk, Scotland.

SterlingOSB was specified by the project engineer and Alan Barton, project manager with main contractor Maxi Construction, who says that it is widely used on most of the projects he works on. “It’s in nearly all timber frame systems and is widely used for roof sarking, especially here in Scotland.” 

Alan estimates that this project will require approximately 1,000 sq m of SterlingOSB for the 100m-long building.

Timber frame construction usually involves the manufacture of panels by specialists off-site. But that is not the case on this project, says Alan: “We are making the panels up ourselves, rather than have them manufactured by a timber-frame company,” he says. Unlike modern timber frame, this design uses steel for the main structural elements and is therefore not ‘timber frame construction’ in the true sense.

The panels, which are made to close tolerances, comprise basic softwood frames incorporating thermal insulation and vapour membranes with SterlingOSB ‘skins’ on both sides to provide strength and stiffness.


 
 
 
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