1-15 of 70
  • Introduction to fire resistant doors
    Fire protection doorsets are installed in commercial, industrial and public buildings to help prevent the spread of fire, ensure safe escape routes, and limit the damage caused by smoke and heat. The stability and integrity...
  • Introduction to suspended ceilings
    Suspended ceilings are typically used in public or commercial environments such as schools, university lecture halls, hospitals, shopping centres or offices. The most common type is a tile system , where square tiles are...
  • Introduction to roof tiles
    Roof tiles provide the final layer of weatherproofing on a building, and have been in use since the 3rd millennium BC. Different tiles suit different roof pitches. Clay tiles are often made from locally sourced material.
  • Introduction to movable walls and partitions
    Movable walls and partitions are used in offices, schools, universities and hotel conference areas to provide versatility to an interior space. They can be specified at the design stage or can be installed as part of an...
  • Introduction to building blocks
    Blockwork forms part of a building’s structure and contributes to its thermal mass. This means it helps the building store, contain and subsequently release heat – an important part of energy efficiency. Walling and flooring...
  • Introduction to gutters
    Roof drainage gutters divert rainwater away from the structure of a building, to be disposed of via downpipes . The gutters – normally narrow eaves channels or troughs – have different profiles to suit the application, such...
  • Introduction to porticos
    Porticos provide shelter from the weather at door entrances. Historically, they have also been used to lend an imposing appearance to the facades of temples, basilicas, country houses and stately homes. Traditionally,...
  • Introduction to balustrades
    The word balustrades, according to the OED, originates from the Italian ‘balaustra’, or pomegranate flower. This is because each baluster would, originally, resemble the vase-like shape of the half-open flower. Natural and...
  • Introduction to portable buildings
    Relocatable buildings can be used for any number of applications, such as site offices, temporary classrooms, portable loos for events, weighbridge and toll station cabins, building site accommodation, and sportsground...
  • Introduction to acoustic panels and baffles
    Acoustic panels and baffles are used to absorb noise and reduce the passage of sound through a building. They are specified to help a building comply with Part E of the Building Regulations. Depending on the product, it may...
  • Introduction to adhesives
    Adhesives in this section are used for gluing or bonding different building finishes and substrates together, be they timber and laminate floors, wall coverings, tiles, facade cladding or structural elements. Synthetic or...
  • Introduction to floor gratings and planks
    Floor gratings and planks are used to create walkways, stairways, wheelchair ramps, fire escapes, gantry platforms and drainage channels. They are typically manufactured from durable materials such as galvanised steel,...
  • Introduction to building boards
    Building boards have a variety of uses in construction, from general-purpose to more specialist applications. They can incorporate specific characteristics, such as increased moisture and impact resistance. Decking boards...
  • Introduction to wall and parapet copings
    Copings and cappings perform dual functions: they provide a neat finish to the top of a wall, and are also designed with protective overhangs or drip grooves that lead rainwater away from the substructure. Often referred to...
  • Window films and coatings – a guidance article
    Window films to cater for glazing-related challenges including heat gain, glare reduction, UV protection, safety, security, privacy, appearance, cleaning, and energy efficiency. Window films and coatings are specified to...