Complete Buildings, External Envelope, Structural Fittings, Building Products & Materials
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  • Introduction to construction sands and aggregates
    Approximately 90% of aggregates in the UK are used by the construction industry. Construction aggregates include crushed rock, gravel and sand, as well as recycled and secondary aggregates. Crushed rock, such as granite, limestone and basalt, is supplied in a range of sizes and polished stone values (PSVs), to be used in filtration, pipe bedding...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to building boards
    Building boards have a variety of uses in construction, from general-purpose to more specialist applications. They can incorporate specific characteristics, such as increased moisture and impact resistance. Decking boards can be used for flat or pitched roof sarking, whilst dense engineered panels can be used in floor and wall construction. Load...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to retail kiosks and booths
    Retail kiosks are a popular means of pushing back against town centres and high streets losing their distinctive identity and becoming dominated by large chain retailers. They are a good way of raising the profile of independent shops, local business and market stalls. Traditional, heritage and ornate designs, and a bespoke approach to design and...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to kiosks and gatehouses
    Kiosks and gatehouses provide accommodation, shelter and facilities for personnel manning secure entrances, car parks, ticket offices or construction sites. Attendant’s cabins and guard-booths are typically insulated, and fitted with windows, shutters and doors. They can also be equipped with services, such as WCs and kitchen plumbing, electrics...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to building and walling stone
    Building and walling stone has been used for the construction of masonry buildings and external walls for thousands of years. Blocks are quarried from natural stone such as sandstone, limestone and slate, or manufactured from reconstructed, cast stone. Dressed stone or ashlars are squared and shaped for a precise fit with other stones, and are...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to wall / ceiling access panels
    Wall and ceiling access panels provide access to mechanical and electrical services so that maintenance and repair can be carried out. Access panels can be made in steel and aluminium, with various fire ratings and levels of thermal insulation. Plastic access panels are cheaper but less durable. Beaded frame access panels have a flange around the...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to gutters
    Roof drainage gutters divert rainwater away from the structure of a building, to be disposed of via downpipes. The gutters – normally narrow eaves channels or troughs – have different profiles to suit the application, such as half-round, boxed and ogee. Systems can be incorporated into the eaves structure to be as unobtrusive as possible, or can...
    Guidance, 07 December 2012
  • Introduction to rooflights
    Rooflights, also known as skylights, can be installed on pitched or flat roofs to maximise natural daylight and reduce dependency on electrical lighting, saving energy and reducing costs. Rooflights help to promote a better sense of wellbeing, and are installed in schools, healthcare facilitates, offices, factories and recreational areas. They are...
    Guidance, 07 December 2012
  • Introduction to roofing membranes
    Roof membranes can be liquid applied, torched on or mechanically fixed to a variety of roof structures. Breathable membranes are vapour-permeable sheets used as underlays in cold and warm pitched roof construction. They allow the roof to breathe while remaining waterproof, and stop condensation forming in roof spaces. Non-breathable membranes are...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to sports and performance floors
    Sports and performance floors are ideal for high-impact activities, ranging from dance to ball sports and aerobics to weightlifting. They will also often have to cater for secondary uses, such as exhibitions or school assemblies. Both permanent and portable systems are available, usually with either a vinyl or timber surface. It is important to...
    Guidance, 07 December 2012
  • Introduction to suspended ceilings
    Suspended ceilings are typically used in public or commercial environments such as schools, university lecture halls, hospitals, shopping centres or offices. The most common type is a tile system, where square tiles are placed within a metal ceiling grid. Ceiling tiles provide acoustic absorption and are usually made from gypsum plasterboard...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to roof cladding sheets
    Roofing sheets form the final weatherproofing cladding on a roof structure. Frequently made from single- or double-skin metal, roof sheeting is also available in GRP and fibre-reinforced cement. Steel, zinc, aluminium, copper and stainless steel sheeting can be supplied in different profiles, such as sinusoidal or trapezoidal formats. Standing...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to floor gratings and planks
    Floor gratings and planks are used to create walkways, stairways, wheelchair ramps, fire escapes, gantry platforms and drainage channels. They are typically manufactured from durable materials such as galvanised steel, aluminum, carbon steel, GRP and stainless steel. Perforated planks are especially suitable for use on oil rigs, and in factories...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to movable walls and partitions
    Movable walls and partitions are used in offices, schools, universities and hotel conference areas to provide versatility to an interior space. They can be specified at the design stage or can be installed as part of an interior refurbishment or fit-out to make better use of existing space. Various types of system are available, including those...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to security shutters
    Security shutters prevent unauthorised access to commercial and retail premises. Shop front shutters are installed behind glass or in front of store entrances for additional security in shopping centres and on high streets. Perforated, punched or glazed shutters provide through-vision, meaning that passers-by can still view merchandise. They are...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012